Archives for posts with tag: New York City Marathon

I did it!

The day after the race and I’m proud to say I have finished my first marathon. It was not as miserable as I would have imagined — the weather cooperated (low 40s, fog), the course wasn’t as bad as people led me to believe (those Galer/Madison hills weren’t too bad), and I feel OK today (well, at least I’m vertical and walking). I really enjoyed visiting with people during the race and got three visits from my lovely girlfriend along the route.

Looking back, running a marathon isn’t just about the race day. It’s the training, the gear, and the camaraderie with fellow runners that makes it worthwhile. I logged almost 400 full miles (complete stats below) during this journey, which started in Africa and ended at Seattle Center. It was a great experience!

Before and after my first marathon

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Irish runner Martin Fagan, suspended for EPO use. Image source: http://corkrunning.blogspot.com

When it comes to connecting distance running with performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs), we know a few things.

  • We know that 2011 saw a record amount of PRs and course records in the sport of distance running.
  • We know that certain illegal substances, specifically EPO, boost the performances of endurance athletes, regardless of sport.
  • We know that purses, appearance fees, and sponsorships have dramatically increased in value.

But, do we know if there’s a problem with PEDs in distance running? Let’s take a closer look.

Read the rest of this entry »

Author and Marathoner Kim Jones

Despite not taking up competitive running until her 20s, Kim Jones became one of America’s elite distance athletes of the 1980s and 90s. In 1991, she was the third-ranked runner in the world after posting a PR of 2:26:40 in the Berlin Marathon.

In her new book Dandelion Running Wild, Jones recounts the stories of her upbringing and how running brought her a sense of peace. I caught up with her by phone from Fort Collins, Colorado.

The Marathon Newbie: How do you feel about running as an avenue of self-therapy?

Kim Jones: I feel like it helped me through a lot of tough times—the running. Back when I first started running, I didn’t even know I was training. I would just go out for a run, running away from my brothers and sisters. Sometimes, I would just run down to the beach. Little did I know as a child, through my adolescence, or even as a young adult that I developed into a marathoner simply because I used running as a therapy.

Read the rest of this entry »

In an attempt to learn more about the situation on the ground in NYC, I engaged soccer scribes Grant Wahl and Dylan Butler this morning on Twitter. Both of those respected voices came out against the marathon. -Andrew

  1. GrantWahl
    Buddy flying in from Seattle to run NYC marathon & stay with us. No power here yet. Why are they still running it?
    Fri, Nov 02 2012 08:20:57
  2. Winner_MLS
    @GrantWahl Runners can still pull out until Saturday and have guaranteed spot in next year’s race.
    Fri, Nov 02 2012 08:23:03
  3. Winner_MLS
    @GrantWahl You don’t train for world’s most prestigious race for 4 months then just not do it. Marathon mindset=overcoming adversity.
    Fri, Nov 02 2012 08:24:24
  4. GrantWahl
    @Winner_MLS You haven’t been in NYC this week, have you?
    Fri, Nov 02 2012 08:25:33
  5. Dylan_Butler
    @Winner_MLS @GrantWahl Andrew, if people train for 4 months for a race, whats another two weeks? To run it Sunday is so inappropriate
    Fri, Nov 02 2012 08:35:51
  6. Winner_MLS
    @Dylan_Butler @GrantWahl I guess I don’t know what it’s like out there. I honestly didn’t NYC was too affected — maybe I’m mistaken?
    Fri, Nov 02 2012 08:39:44
  7. GrantWahl
    @Winner_MLS @dylan_butler 37 dead in NYC, horrific damage in parts of city, no power in lower Manhattan.
    Fri, Nov 02 2012 08:42:07
  8. Dylan_Butler
    @GrantWahl @Winner_MLS Given all that, you could understand why theres an uproar over the diversion of any resources to the race.
    Fri, Nov 02 2012 08:48:39
  9. Dylan_Butler
    Bloomberg comparing Marathon post 9/11 to now is a joke. Then was 8 weeks later, not 5 days later
    Fri, Nov 02 2012 10:42:10

The New York Marathon’s decision to go ahead with Sunday’s race as planned has raised a few eyebrows — and now the ire of a number of groups.

Staten Island’s borough President James Molinaro has perhaps been the most outspoken critic of the decision while attempting to coordinate aid in his borough, the hardest-hit by Hurricane Sandy. Staten Island Advance has the story of Mr. Molinaro calling on organizers to cancel the race, and his voice has later amplified by a similar proclamation from Manhattan counterpart Scott M. Stringer. (Also, Molinaro blasted the American Red Cross, calling their efforts “an absolute disgrace” according to Business Week.)

Read the rest of this entry »

The New York Times is reporting that the New York Marathon will proceed, despite strong objections from some quarters.

There was some worry that Hurricane Sandy would force a cancellation, but organizers confirmed again that they will go ahead with Sunday’s race, considered by many to be the most prestigious marathon in the world.

“The city is a city where we have to go on,” [New York City Mayor Michael] Bloomberg said at a news conference Thursday afternoon.

Much of the distress centers on the availability of the Staten Island Ferry, which usually transports up to 50 percent of the race participants to the starting line. The Times reports that if the ferry is not in service, runners will have to take a bus. According to the official website, those who selected Staten Island Ferry service have been reassigned to buses, with the first wave leaving at a mind-boggingly early 4:30 a.m.

The New York Marathon is the world’s largest marathon with more than 47,000 runners starting last year’s race.

Runners cross over the Verrazano Bridge to begin the 2011 New York City Marathon. Photo from DailyMail.co.uk